Public Safety at Loyola Law School


Burns Building

ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT

LOYOLA LAW SCHOOL CRIME STATISTICS 

Preparation of the Annual Security Report & Disclosure of Crime Statistics

This report compiles information gathered from throughout our community from all divisions and all faculty and staff defined in the Clery Act as “Campus Security Authorities.”  It shows the commitment of Loyola Law School (LLS) to provide our community with policies, practices and outreach that support the safest community possible for all to live, work and learn.

This report provides university policies regarding campus safety and security. Additionally, the report provides statistics for the previous three calendar years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus, in certain off-campus buildings or property owned, leased or controlled by LLS.

LLS does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its educational programs -- sexual harassment and sexual violence are types of sex discrimination.  Other acts can also be forms of sex-based discrimination and are also prohibited whether sexually based or not and include dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking.  LLS issues this statement of policy to inform the community of our comprehensive plan addressing sexual and interpersonal misconduct, educational programs, and procedures that address sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, whether the incident occurs on or off campus and whether it is reported to a University official.  LLS prohibits the offenses of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking and reaffirms its commitment to maintain a campus environment emphasizing the dignity and worth of all members of the university community. Written information respecting services available on and off campus for crime victims, accommodation options and reporting procedures is available for faculty and staff through LLS Human Resources and for students through Student Affairs.  For more information see:

Campus Safety at Loyola Law School

Loyola Law School is located in downtown Los Angeles, one of the most important and dynamic social, cultural and educational centers of the world. Students, faculty and staff at LLS have the opportunity to visit and partake of the city’s varied cultural institutions. Please be aware that, like any other of the world’s major metropolitan centers, care and caution are required when you explore Los Angeles’ many riches and attractions.

The population of Loyola Law School consists of approximately 220 faculty and staff and 1100 students. In compliance with federal regulations, the Safety and Security Department maintains a crime log at the parking structure security desk of all crimes investigated or reported to the Department for the most recent 60-day period. This log is available to the public for viewing during normal business hours of 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday – Friday or at this link: Loyola Law School Crime Statistics, Entries older than 60 days can be obtained by request and will be available within two business days.

Loyola Law School Public Safety Authority

Loyola Law School security officers have the authority to ask persons for identification and to determine whether individuals have lawful business at the Law School. Security officers have the authority to issue parking tickets, which are billed to financial accounts of students, faculty and staff. Security officers do not possess arrest power. Criminal incidents are referred to local law enforcement agencies that have jurisdiction on campus.   The Safety and Security Department maintains a highly professional working relationship with the Rampart Division of the Los Angeles Police Department.  Loyola Law School does not currently operate under agreements such as a written memorandum of understanding (MOU) with state and local law enforcement agencies. All crime victims and witnesses are strongly encouraged to immediately report the crime to the Safety and Security Department and local Law enforcement agencies. Prompt reporting will assure timely warning notices on-campus and timely disclosure of crime statistics.

Emergencies

  • Security:  213.736.1121
  • Campus phones: Ext. 1121
  • Los Angeles Police Department: 911

Any person or member of the campus community should report suspected criminal actions or suspicious activity and other emergencies on campus by dialing the special emergency numbers listed above at any time.

Emergency Phones

For immediate communication with Loyola Law School Security, use one of the yellow emergency call boxes located on campus or the call boxes in the parking structure.  The boxes work like radios – just press the red button to activate.  The blue light will flash and a security officer will respond verbally. Give the officer your location and personnel will be dispatched immediately. If possible, tell the dispatcher the nature of the emergency.

Call Box Locations

  • Loading dock near cafeteria entrance door
  • Rains Library at the base of the wheelchair ramp
  • Parking Structure outside the Security Office
  • Parking Structure interior – all levels (blue lights)
  • Parking Structure stairwells – all levels

Student Counseling Services

Dr. Michael Douglas
Casassa Building, C503
213-736-1122

Student Psychological Services (SPS) is located on the 5th floor of the Casassa building, room C503.  Office Hours are Mondays 9am-1pm.
Tuesdays 2pm-6pm and Thursdays 10am-6pm. Students are seen by appointment only.

Campus Access and Patrolling

All Law School community members are required to have an ID card.  The ID card must be carried at all times while on campus. If for any reason a university official requests that you present your ID card for identification, you must do so. Your ID card is the only readily positive means of identifying you as a member of the Law School community.

The Safety and Security Department provides security coverage for all Law School related functions as deemed necessary by the Manager of Safety and Security.

Students, faculty and staff have access to academic, recreational and administrative facilities on campus.  The general public may attend educational, cultural, recreational and special events at specified locations on the Law School campus. Please note that members of the general public should contact the Los Angeles Law Library: http://www.lalawlibrary.org/ for legal resources and services.  Computer lab use is restricted to use by students, faculty and staff only.

Public or commercial access to any campus location must be cleared in advance with the appropriate campus official.

Parking on campus is restricted and controlled 24 hours a day. Parking cards may be obtained in the Campus Planning office in Founders Hall Room 203.  Click here: https://my.lls.edu/campusplanning/parkingandtransportation/parking for further information on parking regulations. 

Los Angeles Police Department and Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department

LAPD Rampart Division

1401 West 6th St.
Los Angeles, CA 90017
213.484.3400

Los Angeles County Sheriff Station

5019 East 3rd Street
Los Angeles, CA 90022
323.264.4151

Though Loyola Law School does not have any formal written agreements with law enforcement related to the investigation of alleged criminal offenses, Loyola Law School maintains an excellent liaison with the local law enforcement agencies, including cooperating in crime prevention strategies and exchanging information whenever crimes are committed. The police also help to maintain a safer campus by providing extra campus patrols for special events that attract large crowds.

The Department of Safety and Security also regularly confers with the captain(s) of local law enforcement division(s) regarding any police activity at this location. The Department of Safety and Security seeks cooperation of local law enforcement agencies in collecting crime statistics pursuant to the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (“Clery Act”).

In addition, a list of registered sex offenders in California is available at the Los Angeles Police Department and Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, or online at http://www.meganslaw.ca.gov/.

Loyola Law School Emergency Medical Response

Security

Parking Garage
x1121 (on campus)
213.736.1121

Loyola Law School has staff and security personnel trained in first aid and CPR.  If a medical emergency occurs, Security should be contacted immediately.  Security will administer first aid for minor non-life-threatening injuries.  If the injury is serious, life threatening or the injured party requests it, Security will summon the paramedics by calling 911.

Lost and Found

Information & Support Services

Burns Building, 1st Floor
213.736.1001

Loyola Law School does its best to return everything that is found on campus to its rightful owner. For lost or misplaced items, contact Information & Support Services. If your Loyola Law School ID or parking card is missing, report the loss to the Campus Planning office as soon as possible.

Buildings and Grounds

Campus Planning
Founders Hall, Room 203
213.736.8391

The Campus Planning Department maintains law school buildings and grounds with a concern for safety and security.  The Security Department patrols the buildings and grounds and informs Physical Plant of potential safety and security hazards, such as broken windows and locks and poorly lighted areas.

Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures

Timely Warning Crime Alert Information

When a violent crime or crime listed in the Clery Act is reported, it is the consistent practice of Loyola Law School to notify the Department of Safety and Security, and/or designee, who then confers, as necessary and applicable, with administrators, Student Affairs, legal counsel and law enforcement agencies, to determine if the circumstances and facts represent an on-going or continuing threat to the Loyola Law School community. Once a determination is reached that a continuing threat exists, the Deans’ Office in conjunction with the Marketing & Communications Office will arrange to disseminate “timely warning” crime alert information through LLS Alert, Student Affairs and/or the campus-wide email system to ensure all members of the community are likely to have access to the information. Such alerts shall be provided to students, faculty and staff in a manner that is timely, that withholds as confidential the names and other identifying information of victims and that will aid in the prevention of similar occurrences.

Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures Statement

Loyola Law School has clearly established all four phases of emergency management: preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation as a priority on our campus emergency management efforts are overseen by the Campus Planning Department with significant guidance from the Loyola Marymount University Department of Public Safety. 

One of the goals of our Emergency Management efforts is to empower our community to protect themselves during and immediately following an emergency.  Loyola Law School maintains a comprehensive Emergency Operations Plan, which is coordinated and maintained by the Campus Planning Department. The plan includes the expectations of executive administrative staff, volunteer LLS Emergency Response Team staff, volunteer Emergency Operations Center staff and the Law School’s Allied Baron security personnel during an emergency; department operational responsibilities; the process for establishing incident priorities; Incident Command Structure for field response; and Emergency Operations Center (EOC) procedures and protocols.  Throughout the plan, clear assignment of responsibilities established for specific Administrative staff and volunteer staff positions.  The law school practices and tests the Emergency Operations Plan and response procedures through drills, tabletop and functional exercises, and tests of the emergency notification system.

All members of the Loyola Law School community are notified that they can report to the Department of Safety and Security any situation that may threaten the health or safety of community members. Reports can be filed by calling 213.736.1121 (x1121 from a campus phone) or by visiting the Security office in the parking garage. 

Notification to the Loyola Law School Community about an Immediate Threat

Loyola Law School responds to, investigates and documents those situations that are dangerous or may cause a significant emergency. To facilitate this, leaders throughout campus have been trained in the implementation of the Incident Command System. When a significant emergency or dangerous incident is reported to the Department of Safety and Security (such as earthquake, structure fire, hazardous materials leak, or similar major incident), Security personnel will respond to the location (if safe to do so) and will report their findings to the Deans’ Office.  As necessary, Loyola Law School personnel will coordinate a response with the Los Angeles Police Department and the Los Angeles Fire Department in addition to other local agencies, depending on the nature of the event.

The Deans’ Office works in conjunction with the Marketing & Communications Office to craft emergency response messaging and select the appropriate medium or media.  Loyola Law School has multiple channels of communication for use during emergency situations, including the LLS Alert system broadcast via Blackboard Connect (using mass-distributed emails, text messages, and phone calls), public address announcements on campus speakers, social media postings and an emergency hotline phone number (1-866-456-9652/1-866-4LOYOLA) with recorded information. Other local means of communication include use of the campus digital signage, printed signage at highly visible areas and localized use of bullhorns and other small scale announcement tools.  The Marketing & Communications Office will also post updates online at www.lls.edu.  All registered students are required to enroll in LLS Alert, which includes automated email, text message, and phone calls to personal devices. Other members of the community, including faculty and staff can register and update their LLS Alert contact information at www.lls.edu/alert.

In determining the scope of any emergency notification, LLS administrators will take into account the potential community impact.  Loyola Law School will notify the entire campus community if there is a potential that the whole campus or a large segment of the community may be threatened by an incident.  Loyola Law School may also choose to notify only a segment of the population if the nature of the incident and/or the potential impact is confined.

Procedures for Testing Emergency Response and Evacuation

Loyola Law School tests emergency response and evacuation procedures in all buildings every year to educate and train building occupants on evacuation procedures, emergency exits, the sound of fire alarms and the location of safe refuge areas.  All evacuation drills are conducted by the Department of Safety and Security with support from the designated building leaders and floor wardens, Campus Planning, Physical Plant and Housekeeping.

Following all drills, participants are convened at the Safe Refuge Areas to debrief and/or receive additional tips and information. At least one campus-wide evacuation drill is conducted annually. Loyola Law School practices earthquake preparedness annually on the California designated Great Shakeout dates. The most recent earthquake drill was conducted on October 17, 2013.

Every emergency drill and exercises documented, including the date, time, description, whether it was announced or unannounced, and the location. All drill and exercise records are retained by the Department of Safety and Security.

Crime prevention, Education and Awareness

Crime prevention is a high priority at Loyola Law School. Living in a large city requires students, faculty and staff to practice sound crime prevention techniques when walking at night, riding public transportation, safeguarding property or the like.  The Safety and Security Manager or Security Supervisor follows up on all reports of criminal activity by contacting the complainant to ensure that a thorough investigation is conducted. Where appropriate, local law enforcement referrals are made.

The Department of Safety and Security also offers support in the event a community member must report a crime to local law enforcement agencies and will assist with such a report.

Preventing Theft

The prevention of theft is the responsibility of all members of the Loyola Law School community.  Bear in mind your own safety is worth much more than your property.  Never take any personal risk that you can avoid.

Precautions in buildings and common areas

Never leave your belongings unattended. Make sure you keep your bag, digital device(s) or purse where you can see it, not on the floor by your feet or on the back of your chair. Do not keep valuable items in your coat pocket. Report any suspicious persons to the Safety and Security Department immediately at 213-736-1121 (x1121).

Protecting your vehicle or bicycle

Park your car or bicycle in well-lit and busy areas. If you park in a commercial lot or garage with valet attendants, leave only the ignition key with the attendant. Always lock your car, even when you leave it briefly. Do not leave luggage, packages or other valuables inside that might tempt a thief.  If your vehicle is equipped with an alarm system, utilize it.  If it does not, consider purchasing one. 

Always lock your bicycle. A key operated, steel U-shaped lock is recommended. Be sure to use your lock to secure at least your back wheel and frame to a bicycle rack or similar immobile object. On campus, use only authorized bicycle racks. Never lock your bicycle by the front or back wheel alone. Also, lock your bicycle in a well-lit area where pedestrian traffic will discourage theft.

Physical security for computers

Help prevent computer theft by getting your computer secured. Universal notebook security cables and computer recovery software is recommended.

Digital security

Always protect your digital information located on your computer or mobile device by using a strong password that only you know.  Never share your password with anyone.

Personal Safety

800 S. Figueroa Street, 11th Floor

Loyola Law School operates the Downtown Public Interest Law Center, an off-campus site located at 800 S. Figueroa St., Suites 1120 and 1140, Los Angeles, CA 90017.  Loyola Law School has no security presence at this location; security is provided 24/7 by the building owner, Fair Oaks Management.  Loyola Law School is responsible for maintaining records of any Clery Act crimes committed within these two adjacent 11th floor suites.  Faculty, staff and students should report any crimes or security issues directly to Fair Oaks Management and/or their security contractor, or contact LAPD by dialing 911.  Loyola Law School staff should know and understand the building’s security and emergency procedures and make sure that all students are informed about them.

All security systems are controlled and monitored by the building security staff.  A card access system is provided for off-hours access by authorized faculty and staff only.  The building elevators have a floor lockout feature that only allows card access to authorized occupants for that floor.  If you experience problems accessing your floor, notify the security staff in the building lobby.  Report any unauthorized persons exhibiting unusual behavior immediately to building security.  Do not leave valuables, purses, wallets or cash on your desk unattended.  You should report lost or stolen keys and access cards to building security and your LLS supervisor.  Supervisors should then inform Campus Planning so it can order replacement keys/cards from Fair Oaks Management.

On the Street

Try not to walk alone after dark.  If walking alone, always be aware of your surroundings. Walk in well-lit areas, and avoid quiet side-streets or alleys. Do not carry more cash than you need. If you must carry a purse, keep it close to your body and do not resist if it is snatched. If your wallet is stolen, cancel your credit cards and your checking account at once, and report the incident to the local law enforcement agencies.

Los Angeles maintains beautiful parks. When entering remote areas in parks, be alert and avoid potentially dangerous situations.

If someone is following you on foot, remain alert. Look behind you, cross the street and ask for help. If you are being followed by car, turn around and walk in the opposite direction. Try to get the license plate number and call the police. If a driver stops to ask directions, do not approach his or her car. Do not worry about appearing rude.

When using automatic bank teller machines (ATMs), always be aware of the people around you. Be especially careful if the ATMs are located directly on the street. Try to use ATMs during the daylight hours. If you are suspicious of any person near the ATM, do not continue the transaction. Try to have a friend accompany you to ATMs.

Public Transportation

If you are traveling by public transportation, have your payment ready before you go to the stop. Try to stay near people at all times and pick a bus that is occupied by other passengers. If you are suspicious of anyone, notify the driver. Plan your route before you leave. Taxis are the safest — though most expensive — way to travel at night.  When you are dropped off at your destination, have the driver wait for you to enter your building.

Fire Safety

What to Do in Case of Fire

If you discover a fire, immediately pull the nearest fire alarm. There is a fire alarm box on every floor of most buildings on campus near the exits. Report the fire to Security at x1121 (213-736-1121). They will contact the Fire Department. Be aware that transmitting a false alarm is a criminal offense that endangers the lives of both building occupants and emergency personnel. It is also an offense to prop open fire doors or to tamper in any way with alarm equipment, electromagnetic locks or other safety and security devices or to block or obstruct paths of exits.

If the fire is small and not spreading quickly, and you have been appropriately trained, you may try to extinguish the fire yourself with the extinguishers located throughout campus. Do this only after you have sounded the fire alarm. If you are not completely certain about how to operate the extinguisher, do not attempt to put out a fire yourself. Leave the area, closing all doors behind you. Most buildings have automatic fire-detection equipment that sounds an alarm and transmits it to a monitoring company who notifies the Fire Department. If you hear an alarm sounding in your building, do not assume that it is a drill or test. All building alarm systems are tested as required by law, but these tests are announced in advance. Treat every alarm as an emergency unless you have received advanced notification otherwise.

If an alarm sounds, exit the building immediately and follow instructions from the Emergency Team, Security, firefighters, if present, and any PA system announcement. Feel doors with the back of your hand before opening them to be sure that there is no fire danger on the other side. If you must enter a smoke-filled room or hallway, cover your nose and mouth with a wet towel and crawl to the nearest exit, keeping your head near the floor. Never use an elevator during a fire emergency; instead, use fire stairs. If you are injured or disabled, stay in your room and make your presence known to other occupants and to Security by telephone. Emergency Team members will assist you in leaving the building.

Fire Safety Precautions

Keep doorways, corridors and stairwells clear and unobstructed.  Keep fore doors closed.  Make sure that all extension cords are in good condition and UL approved.  Use fuse-protected multi-outlet power strips when necessary.  Do not overload electrical circuits.

Alcohol and Other Drug Use Policy

The possession, use, sale or the furnishings of alcohol on the university campus is governed by Loyola Law School’s Alcohol Policy and California state law. The enforcement of alcohol laws on-campus is the primary responsibility of the Office of Student Affairs. The possession, use, sale, manufacture or distribution of any controlled substance is illegal under both state and federal law and prohibited by the Law School’s Standards of Conduct. Such laws are strictly enforced by Loyola Law School.

Violators are subject to university disciplinary action, criminal prosecution, fine and/or imprisonment. It is unlawful to sell, furnish or provide alcohol to a person under the age of 21. The possession or use of alcohol by anyone under 21 years of age is illegal. It is a violation of the Loyola Law School Alcohol Policy for anyone to consume or possess alcohol in any public or private area of campus without prior approval. Individuals, organizations or groups violating alcohol/drug use policies or laws may be subject to sanctions and/or criminal prosecution, fine and imprisonment.  More information is available in the Student Handbook.  https://my.lls.edu/system/files/student_affairs/docs/jd_student_handbook_v2.pdf

Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Information

Loyola Law School has developed a program to prevent the illicit use of drugs and the abuse of alcohol by students, faculty and staff. The program provides services related to drug use and abuse including dissemination of informal materials, educational programs, counseling services, referrals and university disciplinary actions.

Alcohol and Other Drug Education

  1. The Employee Assistance Program provides confidential service by experienced, master’s degree and doctoral level clinicians. They can help faculty/staff members and their household members deal with issues such as depression, marital and family issues and substance abuse.
  2. The On Campus Psychological Counseling Office provides confidential counseling assistance provided by a licensed clinician. They can help students deal with issues such as depression, marital and family issues and substance abuse.  Group counseling with immediate family members is also available.

University Disciplinary Actions

A violation of any law regarding alcohol and other drug use or possession is a violation of the Law School’s Student Conduct Code and a violation of state and federal law and will be treated as a separate disciplinary matter by the Law School.

Student-on-Student Sexual & Interpersonal Misconduct Policy & Protocol

I. INTRODUCTION

Loyola Law School (“LLS” or law school) recognizes the significant, unacceptable and nationwide existence of sexual and interpersonal misconduct on college and graduate school campuses.  LLS is dedicated to the prevention of such misconduct and to providing a caring, supportive and effective response when such misconduct occurs.  Accordingly, LLS encourages students and law school community members to report such misconduct so that the law school can take appropriate responsive action. 

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (“Title IX”) is a federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs and activities. Under Title IX, discrimination on the basis of sex can include Student-on-Student Sexual Harassment or Sexual Misconduct including sexual violence, rape, Sexual Assault, sexual battery, sexual coercion, sexual exploitation and unwelcome intrusion into another’s sexual seclusion or privacy, as well as interpersonal misconduct including Dating Violence, Domestic Violence and Stalking. The law school has established this Student-on-Student Sexual & Interpersonal Misconduct Policy & Protocol to assist and respond to complaints of student-on-student sexual misconduct and interpersonal misconduct. 

Students should report all forms of Sexual Harassment, Sexual Misconduct (student-on-student; student and non-student; faculty/staff-on-student) and interpersonal misconduct by filing a report with Campus Safety and Security at 213-736-1121 (x1121 on campus). 

In addition, a case for alleged Student-on-Student Sexual Harassment, Sexual Misconduct or interpersonal misconduct will be initiated and adjudicated according to Section VI of this policy, and not according to the process articulated in the law school Discipline Code specified in Student Handbook Section 12.2-12.8: 

Sexual Harassment, Sexual Misconduct, or interpersonal misconduct involving a Student and any non-student in the LLS community is handled and adjudicated under the LLS Discriminatory Harassment and Complaint Process:

All persons, including law school faculty and staff, are prohibited from taking any retaliatory action against any other member of the law school community including, but not limited to, the Complainant, Respondent or witnesses to an alleged incident of Sexual Harassment, Sexual Misconduct or interpersonal misconduct. Any student engaging in any retaliatory action(s) will be subject to discipline under the Standards of Conduct and the Discipline Code and appropriate sanctions for determined violations may include dismissal from the Law School. Retaliation by non-students will be adjudicated and determined in accordance with the LLS Discriminatory Harassment and Complaint Process.  Any Student who believes that they have been retaliated against for having filed, or being named in, a complaint for Sexual Harassment, Sexual Misconduct or interpersonal misconduct or having participated in the investigation of such a complaint, should promptly notify the Campus Safety and Security at 213-736-1121 (x1121 on campus). Any person who believes that they have been retaliated against by a staff or faculty member should notify the Deputy Title IX Coordinator, Barbara Lu-Baltazar at (213) 736-1415. 

II. POLICY

Under Title IX, Sexual Harassment is broadly defined as unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature. It includes unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal, nonverbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature including sexual violence. This policy applies to all students, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. Under this policy, Sexual Misconduct includes all forms of sexual harassment under Title IX including sexual violence, such as rape, sexual assault, sexual battery and sexual coercion. Interpersonal misconduct includes Dating Violence, Domestic Violence and Stalking. All forms of Sexual Misconduct and interpersonal misconduct are unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Any allegation that a student has participated in Sexual Misconduct or interpersonal misconduct will be adjudicated through the process described in Section VI of this policy.  Any student found to have violated this policy will be subject to disciplinary action. 

A. Adjudication of alleged incidents under this policy.  

All alleged incidents of student-on-student Sexual Misconduct and interpersonal misconduct will be adjudicated in accordance with this policy, utilizing the preponderance of the evidence standard.   These proceedings pursuant to this policy shall be prompt, fair and impartial and adjudicated by officials who have received regular training regarding incidents of this nature (“Trained Judicial Officers”).

B. Interim Measures To Ensure Well-Being of Students. 

In cases alleging Sexual Harassment/Sexual Misconduct and interpersonal misconduct including Dating Violence, Domestic Violence and Stalking, the Associate Dean for Student Affairs or a designee may take interim measures, including, but not limited to, academic, residential, transportation and/or employment accommodations, intended to ensure the well-being of the Complainant, the Respondent, the investigatory process and/or the law school community while the complaint is being investigated and prior to the determination on the charge. Any such interim measures shall not be referred to or offered as evidence at the hearing on the underlying charge. Any such interim measures shall be designed and implemented in a manner intended to achieve their purpose while at the same time limiting, to the extent practicable, any adverse effect to the Complainant’s and/or Respondent’s educational program.

C.  No Contact Orders. 

No Contact Orders (NCO) will also be utilized by Campus Safety and Security both during the investigation and through the completion of the disciplinary process. Both parties will be expected to sign a document stating their awareness of the NCO and the stipulations of no contact.

D. Disclosure of Underage/Excessive Consumption of Alcohol or Possession of Illegal Substances.

Except as required by law, including without limitation, disclosure to licensing boards and agencies, violations of the Discipline Code regarding underage or excessive consumption of alcohol or use or possession of illegal substances will not be utilized to commence disciplinary proceedings against a Complainant if the information is divulged through the process of reporting Sexual Misconduct or interpersonal misconduct. The law school reserves the right to refuse to grant amnesty to reporters under certain extenuating circumstances. Criminal investigations and other police action may still occur at the discretion of the law enforcement agency responding to the incident.  

E. Special Training for Investigation and Disciplinary Proceedings. 

Disciplinary proceedings regarding alleged incidents of Sexual Misconduct and interpersonal misconduct will be coordinated by an Associate Dean who is regularly trained in the adjudication of these types of incidents.  The investigative process will involve individual meetings with both parties and witnesses regarding the alleged violation. Students will not be permitted to cross-examine each other or witnesses through these proceedings.

All Judicial Officers receive training regarding the adjudication of allegations of sexual and interpersonal misconduct. For information regarding what training is conducted please visit the LMU Cares office online: http://studentaffairs.lmu.edu/healthwellness/cares/, or contact Briana Maturi, Special Assistant to the Senior Vice President of Student Affairs, (310) 338-2885.

F.  Prior Sexual History. 

Prior sexual history of Complainant or Respondent with people outside of each other will not be utilized as evidence in these disciplinary proceedings.

III. DEFINITIONS

A. Sexual Assault.

For purposes of this policy, Sexual Assault is defined as engaging in sexual intercourse, or any of the sexual activities listed below, with another person without that person’s consent. Sexual Assault includes, but is not limited to, rape, sexual battery, anal intercourse, oral copulation or penetration of a body cavity by a foreign object. Sexual intercourse includes the penetration, however slight, of the vagina or anus with any object or body part and of the mouth with a body part and/or object in a sexual manner.

B.Sexual Harassment.

Sexual Harassment is defined as unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature including, without limitation, unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, intrusion into another’s sexual seclusion or privacy and other unwelcome verbal, nonverbal, auditory, visual, recording, transmission or display of sexual matters or materials or physical conduct of a sexual nature. A sexually hostile environment exists when Sexual Harassment is so continuous and pervasive that it interferes with or limits a student’s ability to participate in, or benefit from, the law school’s educational program.

Sexual Harassment also includes the act of making sexual contact with the intimate body part of another person without that person’s consent, including as the result of sexual coercion. Intimate body parts include the mouth, the sex organs, the anus, the groin or buttocks of any person, and/or the breasts.

For purposes of this policy, Sexual Harassment includes, but is not limited to, invasion of sexual privacy, audio or video recording or photographing of any type (webcam, camera, Internet exposure, etc.) without knowledge and consent of all persons, going beyond the boundaries of consent (such as letting another person hide and watch you have consensual sex without the knowledge of the other party), engaging in unconsented voyeurism, exposing one’s genitals or breasts in non-consensual circumstances, coercing another against their will to expose their genitals or breasts and prostituting another person.

C. Sexual Exploitation.

For purposes of this policy, Sexual Exploitation is defined as sexual misconduct that occurs when a person takes unjust or abusive sexual advantage of another for his or her benefit or for the benefit of anyone other than the exploited party; and that behavior does not otherwise constitute sexual assault. Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to, invasion of sexual privacy, videotaping or photographing of any type (webcam, camera, Internet exposure, etc.) without knowledge and consent of all persons; going beyond the boundaries of consent (such as letting another person hide and watch you have consensual sex without the knowledge of the other party), engaging in voyeurism, exposing one’s genitals in non-consensual circumstances; coercing another to expose their genitals, prostituting another person.

D.  Consent.

a.  Consent is defined as the unambiguous and willing participation or cooperation in act, behavior or attitude that is commonly understood to be consistent with the exercise of free will. Consent requires participants who are lawful adults, fully conscious, equally free and legally competent to act, have clearly communicated their willingness, cooperation or permission to participate in the specific sexual activity engaged in, are positive and clear about their desires and are able to cease ongoing consensual activity at any time. Refusal to consent does not have to be verbal; it can be expressed with clear gestures, body language or attitude. Prior sexual history between the Complainant and Respondent, by itself, does not constitute Consent, nor does consenting to sexual activity with one person imply consent to sexual activity with another person.

b.  Consent is not freely given if:

  1. It is obtained through the use of force, through the fear of or the threat of force, through the abuse of a power position over another (such as employment status or position within an organization) or by kidnap; or
  2. A reasonable person, in the position of the alleged perpetrator at the time the alleged conduct occurred, should have known that the other person was unable to give consent for any of the following reasons:
    1. The individual is unable to make an informed decision as a result of the use of alcohol, drugs or other substances (including but not limited to predatory drugs or prescribed medications); or
    2. The individual is unable to consciously respond for whatever reason including lack of consciousness, sleep, illness or shock; or
    3. The individual is under the age of eighteen and therefore legally incapable of giving consent; or
    4. The individual is known by reason of impairment, mental condition or developmental or physical disability to be reasonably unable to consent.
  3. The individual has acted or spoken in a manner which expresses a lack of consent or a refusal to consent.

E. Domestic Violence.
In accordance with the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, Domestic Violence is defined as a felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabited with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under California law or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under California law

F. Dating Violence.

  1. For purposes of this policy and in accordance with the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, Dating Violence is defined as violence committed by a person:
    1.  Who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; andWhere the existence of such a relationship shall be determined by the victim with consideration of the following factors:
      1. The length of the relationship.
      2. The type of the relationship.
      3. The frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.
      4.  The existence of a social relationship is based on the “Complainant’s statement” with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved. Dating Violence does not include acts covered by the definition of domestic violence.

Dating Violence includes sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.

G.  Stalking.

For purposes of this policy and in accordance with the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act Stalking means engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person(s) that would cause a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the Complainant to fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or suffer substantial emotional distress.

H. Complainant.

Complainant means the individual(s) who files(s) a Discipline Code complaint with the University. In some instances the law school may serve as a Complainant.  Complainants of sexual misconduct and interpersonal misconduct are not required to be members of the LLS community; they may be third parties, or others unaffiliated with the University. Outcomes related to sexual and interpersonal misconduct cases run the full spectrum as outlined in Section 12.1 of the Discipline Code and include disciplinary probation through suspension or expulsion from the Law School.

I. Hostile Environment.

Hostile Environment is defined as any situation in which there is harassing conduct that is sufficiently severe, pervasive and objectively offensive that it limits, interferes with or denies educational benefits or opportunities, from both a subjective (the Complainant’s) and an objective (reasonable person’s) viewpoint.

J. Respondent means the individual(s) against whom a Discipline Code complaint is made.

K. Retaliation means any adverse non-permitted action taken in response to an action or injury by another party towards the actor or by the actor on account of actions toward a third party.

IV. CALIFORNIA LAW

The following excerpts are only partially explanatory of certain California laws pertaining to criminal Sexual Misconduct and interpersonal misconduct. These excerpts are not intended to be an exhaustive description or list of California laws pertaining to Sexual Misconduct, inappropriate or criminal sexual behavior or interpersonal misconduct.

A. Excerpts from Sections 11165.1, 261 and 289 of the California Penal Code:

Sexual assault includes rape, statutory rape, rape in concert, incest, sodomy, oral copulation and penetration, however slight, of the genital or anal opening by any foreign object, substance, instrument, or device, or by any unknown object.

Rape is an act of sexual intercourse accomplished with a person not the spouse of the perpetrator under any of the following circumstances:

1. Where a person is incapable, because of a mental disorder or developmental or physical disability, of giving legal consent and this is known or reasonably should be known to the person committing the act

2. Where it is accomplished against a person’s will by means of force, violence, duress, menace or fear of immediate and unlawful bodily injury on the person or another

3. Where a person is prevented from resisting by any intoxicating or anesthetic substance, or any controlled substance, and this condition was known, or reasonably should have been known, by the accused

4. Where a person is at the time unconscious of the nature of the act, and this is known to the accused

As used in this paragraph, “unconscious of the nature of the act” means incapable of resisting because the victim meets one of the following conditions:

(A) Was unconscious or asleep.

(B) Was not aware, knowing, perceiving or cognizant that the act occurred.

(C) Was not aware, knowing, perceiving or cognizant of the essential characteristics of the act due to the perpetrator’s fraud in fact.

(D) Was not aware, knowing, perceiving or cognizant of the essential characteristics of the act due to the perpetrator’s fraudulent representation that the sexual penetration served a professional purpose when it served no professional purpose.

5. Where a person submits under the belief that the person committing the act is someone known to the victim other than the accused, and this belief is induced by any artifice, pretense or concealment practiced by the accused, with the intent to induce the belief.

6. Where the act is accomplished against the victim’s will by threatening to retaliate in the future against the victim or any other person, and there is a reasonable possibility that the perpetrator will execute the threat. As used in this paragraph, “threatening to retaliate,” means a threat to kidnap or falsely imprison, or to inflict extreme pain, serious bodily injury or death.

California law also states that “The essential guilt of rape consists in the outrage to the person and feelings of the victim of the rape. Any sexual penetration, however slight, is sufficient to complete the crime” (Penal Code section 263). California law further defines both marital rape (Penal Code section 262) and “statutory rape” (Penal Code section 261.5).

Though laws vary from state to state, intercourse in which consent was not obtained or was obtained under coercive conditions will usually be considered rape.

B. Excerpts from Section 261.6 and 261.7 of the California Penal Code:

In prosecutions under Section 261, 262, 286, 288a, or 289, in which consent is at issue, "consent" shall be defined to mean positive cooperation in act or attitude pursuant to an exercise of free will. The person must act freely and voluntarily and have knowledge of the nature of the act or transaction involved. 

A current or previous dating or marital relationship shall not be sufficient to constitute consent where consent is at issue in a prosecution under Section 261, 262, 286, 288a, or 289.

Nothing in this section shall affect the admissibility of evidence or the burden of proof on the issue of consent. In prosecutions under Section 261, 262, 286, 288a, or 289, in which consent is at issue, evidence that the victim suggested, requested or otherwise communicated to the defendant that the defendant use a condom or other birth control device, without additional evidence of consent, is not sufficient to constitute consent.

C. Excerpts from Section 646.9 of the California Penal Code:

Any person who willfully, maliciously and repeatedly follows or willfully and maliciously harasses another person and who makes a credible threat with the intent to place that person in reasonable fear for his or her safety, or the safety of his or her immediate family is guilty of the crime of stalking, punishable by:

1. Imprisonment in a county jail for not more than one year, or

2. A fine of not more than $1,000, or

3. by both that fine and imprisonment, or by imprisonment in the state prison.

For the purposes of this section, “harasses” means engages in a knowing and willful course of conduct directed at a specific person that seriously alarms, annoys, torments or terrorizes the person, and that serves no legitimate purpose.

D. Excerpts from Section 13700 of the California Penal Code and 6211 of the California Family Code:

“Domestic Violence” means abuse committed against an adult or a minor who is a spouse, former spouse, cohabitant, former cohabitant, person with whom the suspect has had a child or is having, has had a dating or engagement relationship, a child of a party or a child who is the subject of an action under the Uniform Parentage Act or any other person related by consanguinity or affinity within the second degree.

For the purposes of this subdivision, “cohabitant” means two unrelated adult persons living together for a substantial period of time, resulting in permanency of relationship. Factors that may determine whether persons are cohabiting include, but are not limited to:

1. Sexual relations between the parties while sharing the same living quarters.

2. Sharing of income or expenses.

3. Joint use or ownership of property.

4. Whether the parties hold themselves out as husband and wife.

5. The continuity of the relationship.

6. The length of the relationship.

13.5  Complainant/Respondent

A. Complainants and Respondents in a Sexual Misconduct or interpersonal misconduct case have the right to:

1. Make a complaint to Campus Safety and Security.

2. File a police report and take legal action separate from and/or in addition to filing a complaint seeking disciplinary action pursuant to this policy.

3. Be informed of the disciplinary finding (responsible or not responsible) in writing.

4. Present material witnesses to the alleged incident.

5. Refuse any/all of the above. 

V.  TITLE IX

Under Title IX, LLS has a responsibility to respond promptly and equitably to address Sexual Harassment, sexual violence and interpersonal misconduct. If LLS knows or reasonably should know about Sexual Harassment, sexual violence or interpersonal misconduct that creates a hostile environment, LLS must take action to eliminate the Sexual Harassment, sexual violence or relationship misconduct, prevent its recurrence and address its effects.

LLS has a Deputy Title IX Coordinator, Barbara Lu-Balthazar, who can be reached at (213) 736-1415.  Loyola Marymount University’s Title IX Coordinator is Sara Trivedi, who can be reached at (310) 568-6105.

LLS encourages prompt reporting of crime to Campus Safety and Security and/or law enforcement. A criminal investigation into allegations of Sexual Harassment or sexual violence does not relieve LLS of its duty under Title IX to resolve complaints promptly and equitably. Even if a Student elects not to file a complaint pursuant to this policy, does not request that LLS take any action on the Student’s behalf or is unable to make a report to LLS and/or law enforcement, if LLS knows or reasonably should know about possible Sexual Harassment, sexual violence or interpersonal misconduct, it must promptly investigate to determine what occurred and then take appropriate steps to resolve the situation.  In appropriate circumstances, LLS may report crimes to law enforcement when a victim decides not to report or cannot report the crime.

If you believe that Loyola Law School does not respond appropriately to your allegations of sexual assault, harassment, or misconduct after you have filed a report with Public Safety, Residence Life, or gone through the judicial process, you have the option to file a complaint with the Office of Civil Rights.

1. You may file a complaint in person, online, or by mail

a. In person: via telephone (877) 292-3804.

b. Online: via email: education@usdoj.gov.

c. By mail: write letter to: U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division, 950 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Educational Opportunities Section, PHB, Washington, D.C. 20530.

2. For more information about filing a complaint please visit: https://www.notalone.gov/students/#how-do-i-file-a-complaint-about-my-school-and-then-what-happens

VI.  REPORTING MISCONDUCT.

A.  Reporting Misconduct.

The law school encourages students to report sexual harassment, sexual misconduct or interpersonal misconduct so that the law school can investigate and respond effectively.

Once the law school receives a report, it must investigate.

Confidential Resources.

Title IX requires all universities to identify “responsible employees” as those who are obligated to report all details of an incident, including the identities of those involved, to Campus Safety and Security whenever that information is brought forward to the employee. Responsible employees include faculty, administrative staff and some student staff.  Responsible employees do not include the following: 

Professional, licensed counselors, such as Dr. Michael Douglas in the Student Affairs Counseling Office (502 Casassa, 213-736-1122), are not required to report any information regarding an alleged Sexual Misconduct or interpersonal misconduct, to Campus Safety and Security, the Title IX Coordinator or any other reporting body, without consent from the student.  

Pastoral counselors, such as Catholic priests and women religious, are not required to report any information regarding an alleged Sexual Misconduct or interpersonal misconduct, to Campus Safety and Security, the Title IX Coordinator or any other reporting body, without consent from the student provided they receive the information in performance of their pastoral duties. 

Confidential Staff, whose names can be found on the Student-on-Student Sexual and Interpersonal Misconduct Policy website, may speak confidentially with students regarding incidents of Sexual Misconduct and interpersonal misconduct without automatically triggering a University investigation into the matter. These individuals may have time and place reporting responsibilities under the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act (Clery Act), but are not obligated to report identifying information of the Complainant. If the Respondent’s name is presented to a Confidential Staff, they will be obligated to report that information to the Title IX Coordinator. Reports by the Confidential Staff will not trigger a University investigation unless the Title IX Coordinator in consultation with the Associate Dean for Student Affairs or designee determines that an investigation is necessary because:

a. The Respondent has known prior allegations of sexual or interpersonal misconduct and a potential for a campus safety risk exists; or

b. The location in which the alleged incident occurred is a location where previous complaints of sexual or interpersonal misconduct occurred creating the potential for a unsafe environment for the LLS community; or

c. A threat to the campus community at large has been identified; or

d. A frequency or pattern is detected that suggests an unsafe environment exists for the LLS community or an LLS community member; or

e. The Sexual or interpersonal misconduct was perpetrated with a weapon; or

f. The Victim is a minor; or

g. Some combination of the above factors exists. 

C.  Law School Employees Are Obligated to Inform Campus Safety and Security. 

Any law school employee (other than the confidential resources identified in the Resources listing) who receives a report is required to inform Campus Safety and Security about the report they have received. Campus Safety and Security and the law school will follow up on any report it receives about possible misconduct, whether from a student, other member of the community or an anonymous source.

Before a student reveals information, University employees will try to ensure that the student understands the employee’s reporting obligations—and, if the student wishes to maintain confidentiality, direct the student to confidential resources. A student may choose to make a full report or request confidentiality as he or she determines.

D. Student Requests for Confidentiality.

A complainant may report misconduct pursuant to this section and request that the law school not disclose his or her identity to anyone else, including the person who allegedly committed the misconduct. While such a request may limit the law school’s ability to investigate and respond to the reported misconduct, the Title IX Coordinator, in consultation with appropriate school officials, will consider the request in light of LLS’ commitment to provide a safe and non-discriminatory environment for all students and will honor the request, provided such accommodation can be made consistent with LLS’ duties to protect the law school community from sexual and interpersonal misconduct. The Associate Dean overseeing the investigation will promptly notify the complainant making the request whether the law school will be presently able to honor it.

Whether or not LLS is able to grant a request to keep the complainant’s identity confidential, law school personnel will reveal information about investigations and disciplinary proceedings related to sexual harassment, sexual misconduct or interpersonal misconduct only to those who need to know in order to carry out their duties and responsibilities.

E.  Advisors.

At any time prior to or during proceedings regarding an allegation of Sexual Misconduct or interpersonal misconduct governed by this policy, Complainants and Respondents may choose an Advisor of their choice to accompany them during the investigative process or any related meeting that is part of the Student on Student Sexual and Interpersonal Misconduct investigative and adjudicative proceedings.  An advisor is any individual who provides the complainant or respondent support, guidance, or advice. This advisor may be a parent, a community advocate, or any other person. The advisor’s role is purely supportive; the advisor may not speak on behalf of the complainant or respondent.

VI. VIOLATIONS OF THIS POLICY.

All allegations of student-on-student sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, or interpersonal misconduct as defined in this policy will be reviewed, and action taken as warranted, according to the process delineated in this section.  Proceedings shall be prompt, fair and impartial.  Like the Discipline Code, the proceedings defined in this section do not, and are not intended to, emulate the criminal justice system, its processes and/or procedures. 

A. Investigation.

Once a report has been received, the law school will initiate an investigation.  

  1. The investigation shall be conducted by an Associate Dean.   
  2. The law school will notify the respondent in writing that a report of sexual and/or interpersonal misconduct has been made.The notice will generally describe the allegations in the report.The complainant and respondent will be given the opportunity to meet separately with the Associate Dean to review the Policy and these Procedures.  The parties shall have the right to present any relevant evidence in support of or in opposition to the allegations of misconduct in the report. Should either party request, s/he may review, in the office of the Associate Dean, the report of misconduct and any information or evidence submitted in support of or in opposition to the report.
  3. The Associate Dean conducting the investigation will have successfully completed required University training and may also employ the services of a qualified private consultant investigator to assist in the fact-gathering portion of the investigation. 
  4. The law school’s investigation and adjudication of any reports will continue during any law enforcement proceeding. The Associate Dean conducting the investigation may need to temporarily delay an investigation while the police are gathering evidence but will resume the investigation after s/he learns that the police department has completed its evidence-gathering and will generally not wait for the conclusion of any related criminal proceeding.
  5. The Associate Dean and/or the investigator (or team of investigators) assisting the Associate Dean will gather pertinent documentary materials (if any) and other information.  The Associate Dean will determine the manner of the investigation, but it will typically involve talking to the complainant, the respondent, other involved or observing parties, and reviewing other relevant information, such as emails, voicemail messages, text messages, photographs, etc.

B. Determination of Discipline 

1.  The Associate Dean conducting the investigation will review all evidence respecting the report and make a determination of whether the policy has been violated.  Using the preponderance of evidence standard, the Associate Dean will determine whether this policy or any of the Standards of Conduct have been violated.

2. If the Associate Dean concludes that either this policy or the Standards of Conduct have been violated, the Associate Dean will determine the appropriate sanction, pursuant to Section 12.1 of the Student Handbook.  Sanctions may include, but are not limited to, expulsion, indefinite suspension, suspension until a specified date, formal censure, oral censure, academic penalty, disciplinary probation, and revocation of the degree.

3.  The Associate Dean shall notify the complainant and the respondent of his/her conclusion in writing.  Either the complainant or the respondent will have the right to appeal the decision.

C. Appeal. 

  1. Once written notification of the resolution has been provided, the complainant and the respondent will have the opportunity to appeal the outcome, including any discipline or corrective measure imposed, and/or the issue of whether there has been a Policy violation.  
  2. Any appeal must be submitted in writing to the Title IX Coordinator within ten (10) calendar days of being notified of the outcome of the investigation or hearing.  
  3. Appeals will be heard de novo.
  4. Appeals will be considered by a hearing board consisting of two members of the law school’s Student Conduct Committee, and a trained judicial officer from Loyola Marymount University.  The Title IX Coordinator will refer the appeal to the chair of the Student Conduct Committee. 

VII. ADVISOR

Prior to the commencement of proceedings regarding an allegation of Sexual Misconduct or interpersonal misconduct governed by this policy, both the Complainant and the Respondent will be assigned Advisors by the Associate Dean for Student Affairs or designee to assist the Students as they progress through the process outlined in this policy. Students are not required to utilize their appointed Advisors, and may select a different Advisor. In the unique instance of an incident involving Sexual Harassment/Sexual Misconduct and interpersonal misconduct, Complainants and Respondents may choose an Advisor of their choice.

What Should You Do if You Experience Sexual Assault, Sexual Violence, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence or Stalking?

A. Go to a safe place as soon as you can

B. Preserve all physical evidence

Do not wash your face or hands, bathe, brush your teeth, drink or eat, douche or change clothes. If you do change your clothes, put all clothing you were wearing at the time of the assault in individual paper bags (not plastic). It is important to preserve as much evidence as possible for investigation and processing of criminal and/or disciplinary charges.

C. Contact LLS Campus Safety & Security at 213-736-1121 (x1121).  Public Safety can assist you in reporting a crime that occurred off-campus to the appropriate authorities. You may decline to report your experience to such authorities.

D. Seek immediate or prompt medical treatment (typically within 72 hours)

It is important to seek immediate or prompt and necessary follow-up medical attention for several reasons:

1. To assess and treat any physical injuries you may have sustained.

2. To determine the risk of sexually transmitted diseases or pregnancy and take appropriate medical measures.

3. If you choose, you may have evidence collected and preserved to aid in the investigation and processing of criminal and/or disciplinary prosecution.

It is best for any physical evidence to be collected within the first 24 hours following the incident. (The quality and quantity of evidence collected later than this may be substantially diminished.)

E. Visit the Rape Treatment Center at Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center – (310) 319-4000 and/or utilize the other resources in closer proximity to LLS, as listed on our website.

The Rape Treatment Center can provide general medical treatment and, if you choose, collection of evidence. A medical exam could include treatment of any physical problems; evaluation of risks; various lab tests for sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy; appropriate treatment; identification and collection of physical evidence of any Sexual Assault.

A specially trained nurse will perform the evidence collection exam. A Sexual Assault advocate or a support person of your choice may be present throughout the procedure.

The Rape Treatment Center hospital emergency department follows national standards for victim care, Sexual Assault exams and evidence collection procedures. If the decision is made to conduct an evidence collection exam, the anonymous evidence may be held for six months or longer. This means you do not have to decide immediately whether or not you want to press charges.

The Rape Treatment Center also provides long term counseling support for victims of Sexual Assault and Sexual Violence, as well as advocacy and accompanying services.

F. Schedule non-emergency medical treatment

Even if you choose not to go to the hospital or to seek immediate medical attention, it is still important to get medical attention to treat any physical problems and to conduct various lab tests for sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy.  Please consult the list of local resources on the website.

G. Utilize counseling services (213-736-1122)

LLS’s Counseling Office (Dr. Michael Douglas, 213-736-1122, 502 Casassa) is available for students in crisis. Dr. Douglas will quickly make an appointment to see you if you have an emergency.

Loyola Law School and Community Sexual and Interpersonal Misconduct Resource Contact List

The following resources are available to students and other members of the Loyola Law School community for information and support concerning sexual and interpersonal misconduct:

Barbara Lu-Baltazar                                                                               
Deputy Title IX Coordinator                                                 
213-736-1415                                                                         
Casassa 501                                                                          

Sara Trivedi  
Title IX Coordinator       
310-568-6105    
University Hall 1900
Loyola Marymount University                                                                                  

Campus Resources:

On-Campus Psychological Counseling Office                   
213-736-1122
Casassa 503 

Campus Chaplain
213-736-8193     
Burns 213                                                                

Office of Student Affairs  
213-736-8151                                                                        
Founders Hall 107                                                                 

Campus Security      
213-736-1121    
Parking Garage Entrance

Community Referrals:

Hospital of the Good Samaritan                                          
1225 Wilshire Boulevard                                                      
Los Angeles, CA 90017                                                         
General Information: 213-977-2121                                     
www.goodsam.org                                                                                

St. Vincent Medical Center
2131 W. 3rd Street
Los Angeles, CA 90057
General Information: 213-484-7111
http://stvincent.dochs.org/

Peace Over Violence Sexual Assault Treatment Center
605 W. Olympic Blvd., Ste 400
LA CA 90015
213-626-3396

LAPD

Rampart Community Police Station
1401 West 6th St.
Los Angeles, CA 90017
213-484-3400 Voice
213-484-3664 TDD/TTY
911 (life-threatening emergencies);
626.793.3385 (LAPD rape hotline)

Legal Aid Foundation

1550 W 8th St
Los Angeles, CA 90017
213-640-3881

State Bar of California
Lawyer Referral Services
866-422-2529

Annual Disclosure of Clery Act Crime Statistics

The Campus Planning Department prepares the Annual Security Report to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act.

This report is prepared in cooperation with the local law enforcement agencies near our campus and the Office of Student Affairs.  Each entity provides updated information on their educational efforts and programs to comply with the Clery Act. The crimes reported are not necessarily committed against a member of the law school community. Crimes that may have occurred on off-campus locations are not included in the university’s statistics, excepting crimes that occur at the Downtown Public Interest Law Center located at 800 S. Figueroa Street, 11th Floor. The definition of each crime may differ from the definition of comparable crimes under the California Penal Code or university discipline policies. In addition, the Clery Act also requires reporting of hate crimes in certain categories where prejudice on account of race, gender, gender identity, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity/national origin, or disability was a factor.

The following statistics, which include crimes on campus and crimes in adjacent public areas, are collected by the Safety and Security Department and are based on crimes reported directly to that department and information provided by local law enforcement agencies.   In preparation for the annual reporting, persons within each school of the university with significant responsibility for student and campus affairs, including disciplinary affairs, are surveyed for knowledge of crimes that may not have been reported to Safety and Security or local law enforcement agencies. These individuals include the Associate Dean for Student Affairs, heads of student groups, certain student group advisors and Student Affairs personnel. Counseling and Psychological Services and Campus Ministries are not surveyed for knowledge of certain crimes because the law does not impose a reporting obligation on persons with counseling or pastoral obligations. If a campus official has knowledge of a reportable crime that was not reported for investigation or disciplinary action and he or she informs Safety and Security, that occurrence will be included in these statistics.

By October 1 of each year, the University distributes an email notification to all enrolled students, current faculty and staff that provides the intranet website address to access this report. A paper copy of this report will be provided to any person upon request and can be obtained by calling 213-736-8391.

The information presented in this Annual Security Report is believed to be accurate as of January 2014. 

Definitions

  1. On-Campus includes all buildings owned or controlled by Loyola Law School within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by LLS in direct support of, or in a manner related to, its educational purposes.
  2. Public Property includes all public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, within the campus or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.
  3. Non-Campus includes all buildings owned or controlled by Loyola Law School used in direct support of, or in a manner related to, its educational purposes, frequently used by students and not within the same reasonably geographic area the LMU campus.
  4. Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter is the willful (non-negligent) killing of one human by another.
  5. Negligent Manslaughter is the killing of another person through gross negligence.
  6. Forcible Sex Offense is any sexual act directed against another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or not forcibly or against that person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent. Includes forcible rape, forcible sodomy, sexual assault with an object, and forcible fondling.
  7. Non-Forcible Sex Offense is unlawful, non-forcible sexual intercourse, including incest and statutory rape.
  8. Robbery is taking or attempting to take anything of value from the car, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.
  9. Aggravated Assault is an unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury.
  10. Burglary is the unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or theft.
  11. Motor Vehicle Theft is the theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle.
  12. Arson is any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc.
  13. Domestic Violence is a felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, a person whom the victim shares a child in common, a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under California law, or any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under California law.
  14. Dating Violence is violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.
  15. Stalking means engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his or her safety or the safety of others or suffer substantial emotional distress.
  16. Hate Crime is any of the above criminal offenses and any other crime involving bodily injury, theft, intimidation, assault or destruction/damage/vandalism committed against a person or property which is motivated in whole or in part by the offender’s bias. Bias is a preformed negative opinion or attitude toward a group of persons based on their race, gender, gender identity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, ethnicity or national origin.

 

Campus Emergency Phone Map